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Archive for January, 2017

Dear friends,

Noah from Uganda called this morning to let me know that his mom had just passed away.

While we are all happy for her new adventure in Heaven, we need to remember the family, especially Elijah, her husband, and all the children. This has been a long, drawn-out illness that is finally over, but still, they need prayer.

I would like to share what the Lord showed me about this lady for just a moment.  We were in Uganda at a gathering somewhere off the beaten track, having services under some tarps on top of a large hill. The power of God was flowing through there like the wind. We saw some very special healing miracles happen, some while I was praying and some that just happened on their own. The atmosphere was like being in Heaven itself. It’s hard to describe what it was like – you’d have to have been there to really get it.

Noah’s whole family was there – brothers, sisters, Mom and Dad.  While Ruth, Noah’s sister, was singing and we were literally swimming in the Holy Spirit, I looked over at Noah’s Mom and Dad and the Lord opened my eyes to see them as He saw them. They were royalty in His eyes. Their testimony and their depth in God is a long story that will not be fully told until Eternity, but suffice it to say that I could feel the depth of it and I knew who they were in God.  Royalty.

Noah’s mom was a prayer warrior that will be sorely missed. When she began to pray, things moved in the unseen world, veils were pierced, and God listened. I pray that God raises up others to step into her place, willing to go through the sufferings of the Body of Christ that those who choose to walk in His depth must go through, to come out of severe battle in victory and see Him and Him alone exalted.

Good travels, Mama. I can almost see the smile that is on Jesus’ face as He welcomes you home.

Brother Dale

 

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This morning I was reminded of a pastor I met in northern Nigeria some years ago that would go out without any money and plant churches. He had few resources but would raise the church up until it was healthy and firm, and then he would go off to another area to plant the next church. When I met him, he had already planted several churches this way, taking nothing for himself for money or support. He just went on by faith.

I am also reminded of another pastor that I ministered with who was given $50,000 as an offering from a UK-based church. Instead of buying himself a nice home or car, he used that money to build the foundations for over 150 churches across northern Uganda. He remained dirt poor and didn’t have the money to finish many of those buildings, but they were functioning churches, and that was what mattered for the hundreds of people that worshipped God in them.

I know several men and women of God like that.

Is this what I see here in the modern church world in America where the preachers expound more about blessings and prosperity than the sufferings of the Cross and the fear of God? They proudly display their wealth across the television networks as a sign of their blessings from God. I am tired of hearing that it’s not the money, but the love of money that is root of all evil, all the while using that same scripture as an excuse to pursue more wealth. As the scripture says, they think “gain is godliness” (1 Tim. 6:5). But the admonition is to turn away from them because they are destitute of the truth.

And as the shepherd goes, so goes the flock. Our church world has, in many areas, taken on a worldly sheen that even the unsaved can recognize. They can see it, and we can’t. Small wonder that so many refuse to darken the doors of any church. They don’t see anything in the modern church world that they want.

Do you see what I am seeing? Can you feel that something in the church world is just not right, but you’re not quite sure what it is? Does it seem difficult to pick out any one thing that you can point to as wrong, but still there is that feeling that something is off? A friend of mine calls it cognitive dissonance.

How did we get so far off course? This was not the way the church was a couple of generations ago. Certainly we’ve seen men of God that were blessed and enjoyed a certain amount of wealth, but not to the degree of the lavish lifestyles we see today. The difference that is so startling is not about the money, but the attitude.

Are we focused on the comforts of the crown, or the sufferings of the Cross? Are the rewards we pursue measured in coin or in souls? Are we trying to get our rewards now, or lay them up for Eternity?

Paul said that he would not glory except in the cross, “by whom the world is crucified unto me, and I unto the world.” (Gal 6:14) The apostle John agreed and warned us to not love the world, neither the things in the world, for if we did, the love of the father would not be in us. (1John 2:15). Even James told us that friendship with the world is enmity with God. (James 4:4)

So how did so many of us lose our bearings? Perhaps it is a matter of what we are focused on.

I see so many Christians in the churches dive off into their own ministries, which seems encouraging until I notice that they are running around ministering to each other and have forgotten the commission that was given to them to go unto the lost. They seem to be run more like a corporate business than an outreach by faith. Few are willing to give up the security of a paycheck to run off into the bush to plant a church with nothing in their pocket. Neither do many feel the call to sacrifice everything they have in life just so they can go.

Is this generation focused only on their own lives, what they want, and how they want it, rather than the crucified sacrifice that fueled our forefathers? Is it all about us and how we want it instead of blindly throwing yourself at God and let him take you through the valleys of death to strip the “you” out of you? Or like Gideon who refused to compromise with the worldly church that the Israelites had become, but instead threshed his wheat in secret by the winepress of God, away from the religious ways of a carnal church.

Paul echoes Isaiah as he cried out for us to come out from among them and be separate people unto the Lord. Jesus said just as he was preparing to go to Calvary that “ye are not of the world”. If you were, as John says later, the world would hear you (1 John 4:5,6). Peter says we are supposed to escape the pollutions of this world by cutting off our desire to be like them. (2 Peter 2:20)

Is this what I see in the modern church world today? Is this the example that is set by our affluent clergy and wealthy congregations? Or, is this the same spirit that led the children of Israel to worship golden calves at the foot of Mount Sinai?

Choose a path. I don’t believe you can have both. The deception of the world is too strong to dabble in. Like skating on thin ice to see how far you can go, you may not find out until it is too late.

“Woe to them that are at ease in Zion, and trust in the mountain of Samaria … That lie upon beds of ivory, and stretch themselves upon their couches, and eat the lambs out of the flock … and anoint themselves with the chief ointments: but they are not grieved for the affliction of Joseph.” (Amos 6:1-6)

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“And I heard a voice from heaven saying unto me, Write, Blessed are the dead which die in the Lord from henceforth: Yea, saith the Spirit, that they may rest from their labors; and their works do follow them.” Revelations 14:13

That’s exactly how I feel sometimes. I’m looking forward to dying so I can get a break. But I don’t want any more work following me. I’ve had enough work to last for a lifetime!

Have you ever felt like that? Everything is a struggle and nothing ever seems to go smoothly? It’s like you’re pushing a cart through Life and the road is always going uphill. When do we get to sit on that cart and ride it downhill?

I realize that work is what we got out of the Garden of Eden. Whether it’s fair or not, we have inherited our ancestor’s foolishness. (Thanks a lot, Dad.) Did God allow this to happen so that we would really appreciate Heaven when we finally got there? If that’s the case, then I’m ready, Lord. You can beam me up any time.

Maybe that’s why the Bible says we need a vision. We would actually perish without one because we’d have nothing to strive for, no reason to push through the hard stuff, no light to give us a direction. We need something to get us through those times when we feel like we have the best product in the world (and we do), but nobody wants it, and you are just beating your head against a wall. It’s times like that when we need those anointed people who light a torch of faith and hope that inspires us to keep going.

David was like that. In one of his many times of darkness, he wrote in Psalms 37, “I have seen the wicked in great power, and spreading himself like a green bay tree, Yet he passed away, and, lo, he was not.” Your time will come. The superficial never last long, and the chaff always get blown away, but that which you have planted and worked so hard for in the Lord will follow you one day.

Does it seem dark and fearful right now? Does it seem like God has forgotten you and is a million miles away? David answered again, “Yea, though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death, I will fear no evil: for thou art with me.”

The nature of faith is that you face the direction that your heart wants to go in and you choose to believe. The inspiration to keep going springs forth from the seeds of that faith that you planted.

Keep going. You’re almost there.

“They that sow in tears shall reap in joy. He that goeth forth and weepeth, bearing precious seed, shall doubtless come again with rejoicing, bringing his sheaves with him.”  (Psalms 126: 5,6)

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