Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘travel’

I’m sitting in the airport surrounded by Nigerians on their way home. This will make the 5th or 6th trip to Nigeria for me, but unlike the crowd of Africans around me that returning to familiar homes, I feel like an invader coming into a foreign land. Nigeria has never been comfortable for me.

There are two reasons: one is cultural; the other is prophetic.

I have found Nigeria to be a hard place. This is a strong people in a difficult country.Whether that is because of the over-population, the incredible amount of corruption that comes as a result of huge amounts of oil money, or something in their blood, Nigerians are a strong people in the midst of a social conflict in a hard land.

The other reason may be considered debatable depending on what your end-time view are. I believe that Nigeria is key to the rest of the sub-Saharan continent. In order for revival to fully sweep across Africa, Nigeria must fall to the dominion of Jesus Christ. There is just something about these people that strike me as a cornerstone for Africa. I believe that Satan knows that also, and for that very reason he has entrenched himself deeply into the Church.

It’s not the Muslims that are the biggest threat, or even the criminal element. Even the wickedness in the political leadership is being driven by, not driving, this darkness. It is the wickedness that is found in the depths of the established Nigerian Church that is the fountain that contaminates the society.

On the surface, it would seem that Lagos is the most religious city in the world, but underlying that are deep pools of wickedness. No matter where you go, you will see posters and signs declaring the next Night of Miracles at one meeting or the Showers of Blessings at another. Religious names are everywhere as if it is a lucky charm for retail businesses to be called the Glory to God Cafe or the Heavenly Blessings Gas station.

And yet, Lagos remains one of the most corrupt cities in the world. Why is that? Reinhard Bonke can have his million person crusades, but the next day nothing has changed. There is something endemic that Satan has buried deeply in the Nigerian culture that resists true holiness in God. The signs are there; the talk is there, even the outward show is there; but something is missing.

I am here to preach revival and to plant a seed of resistance to the debilitating messages of corrupt prosperity and the weakening influence of their false prophets. I am not the usual evangelist with the usual message of peace and love and grace. I have a truly Biblical prophetic message: repentance, righteousness, and the fear of God. Real peace and love and mercy grows out of righteousness into true charity and a deep, driving burden to win the lost. There is a huge difference between the two.

And I think that is what is missing here – true holiness and unselfish charity. It is the message I have brought across Africa for 15 years and has worked everywhere I have preached it. I pray God it will work here.

The world is waiting for this last, great revival to start, and this is the last obstacle to be removed.

 

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

Introduction

In the 1970s, God swept across California with an outpouring of the Holy Spirit like had not been seen for years. Many of the older generation who had experienced the revivals of the 40s and 50s rejoiced to see the Spirit of God moving again. Their pulpits had grown cold over the years, their altars had been abandoned, and the Church world had settled into the same religious environment that they themselves had revolted from in their generation. The excitement was gone, and church had gone back to its normal sedate self.

But here, finally, was a brand new move of God.  It didn’t come the way they expected, nor to whom they expected – God came to the Hippies, the disaffected youth who were searching for Truth in any way they could find it. But the fire of God was undeniably burning, souls were getting saved again and God was on the move.

I got saved during those early days of the Jesus Movement.  We were so full of the Spirit that nothing else mattered to us. Every night, the lost would pack the church to hear a message of the power of God unto Salvation. The Holy Spirit would descend in such an overwhelming presence that there were times that the air literally shimmered from the glory of God. Lives were immeasurably changed as souls flocked to the altar to give their lives to Jesus Christ.

Night after night, week after week, year after year, we immersed ourselves in the flow of the Holy Ghost. We fully expected that the Lord’s return was surely imminent and we would ride this great wave of revival until He came to catch us up into Heaven for Eternity.

But as things always go, the revival dissipated after about 10 years, even sooner in other places, and we were left wondering what happened. People went back to their different paths of Life, pursued forgotten careers, raised families, and settled once again for a normal, sedate Christian life.

Many of us, however, never let go of the dream that had been kindled in our hearts during those heady days of revival. We never forgot what it was like to feel that power flowing through us during services, and we never let go of the great calling that we knew had been placed on our lives.

Winding the clock ahead 30 years, I’ve watched the Church in America slide into an plastic rendition of what we once had, trying to imitate the excitement of those days with upbeat modern music, Hollywood-like presentations on stage, and “feel good” messages designed to comfort rather than convict.

I now know how those old-timers felt as they watched the holiness and glory drain out of the movement that had been ignited by the old Brush Arbor revivals. I can now understand how they must have cried out to God on worn-out knees to send another outpouring of His Holy Spirit. The glory had departed and they were left with only a slim ray of hope that it would return.

For years, I had been preaching a message of revival on radio and in newspaper columns, but in 2004, I felt the Lord lift the burden and begin to turn my attention overseas. Even though I had little to show for all those years of preaching, it was hard to abandon what I had been doing for so long. I felt as if I had been dropped off in a desert with no direction. But all the while that I was wondering if I had simply been dismissed, God was making other plans.  He sent me to Africa.

I am not an accomplished evangelist, a learned theological scholar, nor a well-trained missionary. In fact, when I first headed to Africa, I had no idea what I was doing. I had no plans, no organization supporting me, and no expectations. I just showed up, believing that the God who had sent me would also show up.

What the Kenya Diaries relates is the beginning of an incredible journey. What started as a step of blind faith has led to a resurgence of hope in the power of God. The excitement that I have felt must have been just like what those old-timers experienced back in 1970 when they saw the Jesus Movement rise up. God had turned to a new people that the established Church had never expected, so that He could bring life in the Gospel back to the Church.  He is doing the same today. America brought the Gospel to Africa, but I believe that Africa will be bringing it back to America.

As you read the Kenya Diaries, I hope you get a sense of the same excitement that I had as I followed the leading of the Spirit in a journey that led into a growing move of God. I have no doubt that this new move of God will result in a blaze of revival that will be so hot that it will be felt around the world.

The Kenya Diaries is the start of that journey.

Read Full Post »

We’re here in Buchanan City. Buchanan would be a moderate city for Liberia, but it’s really, really run down. We met with the Governor and his chief Religious Officer for the area. They are both strong, excitable Christians. As the Religious Officer shook my hand, he said, “I can tell there’s fire in your eyes.” I thought, wow, this is a good sign.
The services we had were a conference for over 20 churches in the area that wanted to join the Revivalfire Movement of Liberia. This is a new organization that was set up by Pastors Momo and Theo to continue the message of revival that I brought back in 2014 during the Ebola Crisis. About 50 people showed up ready to absorb everything they could. They want revival and are like sponges soaking up everything I tell them.

Services were great. I didn’t need an interpreter, and that always makes it so much easier. The schedule was for two services a day – one in the morning, one in the evening, a women’s conference on the fourth day, and then an ordination service for me to anoint, commission, and ordain pastors and apostles to this organization. I guess that makes me a bishop now.

Right from the start, the momentum started to pick up and the services were on fire. Blazing services! The Spirit of the Lord was moving so strong that they were with me every step of the way. Some of them would even quote verses before I got around to quoting them. No matter how strong or controversial I was, they were right in sync with me. They got it!

I passed out the Four Steps to Revival and our Revivalfire brochures to everyone. They held on to them as if they were life preservers. These people were serious. They were serious not only about revival, but about what it takes to have one. They understand that there is a price to pay for any move of God, and but that the messages that are coming out of America – the bland, Jesus-loves-you messages – are not doing anybody any good. Those kind of homogenized, placid messages will never effect change because they don’t challenge the hypocrisy that inhabits the church.

The questions at the end of each session reflected that same understanding. “What about false prophets that say things that never happen?” “What about ordinations and titles?” These were things that they knew were wrong but had inserted themselves into the church. They exhibited a level of understanding that you don’t see in many other places.

In other places where we do not see that level of understanding and participation, we still see great moves of God because there is always a handful of people that are willing to light the torch and head off into the darkness to plant churches and start revivals. So what can we expect here? If only a handful have done great things in other places as a result of these meetings, what will happen here in Liberia where the response is so much greater?

I am pretty excited, but I am so worn out that it is only the excitement that keeps me up and running. When I get back to the hotel, I collapse. I’m not as young as I used to be. Or is it that the devil is fighting us stronger because he can see what is happening here?

It may not be easy out here, but I am looking forward to some great things to happen.

Read Full Post »

The African soul is tied closely to the earth, almost as if was somehow merged with the soil from which we have all come from. It’s not the bare feet or the rural setting that you find here, but more of a huskiness and an earthy feel to everything, from their art and music, to the brightly colored primitive designs of their fabrics that they wrap themselves in that lends color and atmosphere to the air you breath. It’s as if their connection with Mother Earth inhabits their very breath.

Western sophistication seems artificial in contrast. Our high-paced electric intensity, lit in the neon lights of our digital society, may seem brighter at first glance, but somehow loses a depth of color that hints at a depth of soul that is shallow in comparison. It’s something that is hard to put in words but can be felt when you are here, immersed in their midst.

True revival is not based on money or sophistication. Actually, I believe those things actually work against a true revival. When we become set on our own artificial substance and abilities, we lose the essential reliance upon God that is an absolute requirement for God to move among us.

Not” by might, nor by power, but by my spirit, saith the LORD of hosts.” (Zech. 4:6)

Revival will break out in Africa first because they need Him more than we do in the West. Yes, they have a long way to go in other essentials, but their hearts have a childlike reliance on God that we have lost. They can learn to do those other essentials, but it is not so easy for us to change our soul.

I don’t know what to think about all these things. I look out over the patchwork of tiny garden plots amidst the shambles of worn out shacks, poverty, and dirt and I wonder how will God do this? Is this really possible that He will raise these simple, earthy people to a place of revival that the world will envy?

But then, that would be just like Him to do that.

Me? I will just keep on hammering out this message that He has given me. It seems to be working everywhere that I have brought it. Sometimes I wonder how that is possible to go to places no one else will go, to wring out my soul to a small people in small churches in desolate places, and watch them ignite in place after place.

The Lord gave me a vision once where I could see myself taking precious seeds and sticking them deep into foot-high furrows of soft brown earth. The seed will germinate in its time and miraculously reappear as a harvest.

I don’t have to know how; I just have to keep planting that seed into those soft furrows of earth and pray that the rain will soften the hard fallow ground back home.

Read Full Post »

The sigh of relief was palpable as our car crossed the border from the Congo into Rwanda. I’ve told many people that there is a demonic spirit of oppression that lies over this country, similar to what grips Nigeria. We could feel the instant relief as we crossed the river.

While that may cause some to want to stay away from the Congo, it strikes me as a spiritual call to action. Yes, this is a really hard place to minister in. There is a constant push to get money out of you, almost ingrained into their culture. Couple that with an unrelenting pushy attitude to get what they want regardless of whatever you say. I don’t even think they see it in themselves, it is so ingrained in the way they are, but it sure makes you want to scream sometimes.

But in the midst of the crowds, there are heroes. They get you. They fully understand that the Church has diminished into a hollow structure, echoing the glory from 40 years ago in a vain attempt to convince themselves that everything is good. They know how badly they need revival and are desperate for the messages that I bring. Others are shaken to the core with the message (it is a very hard message), because they readily admit that they know it is true and that they have been coasting on the ripples of the last move of God. They finally realize how much trouble they are in.

So why is there such an oppressive spiritual cloud hanging over this place? I know that a lot of the answer lies in the 15-year war that has cause over 5 million dead, untold thousands raped and tortured, and an entire generation warped with pain. Corruption and hate are the two ugly children that are birthed from horrors such as that. But perhaps there is more to it. Maybe Satan is scared of what might happen here and is doing his ugly best to keep the Spirit of God from piercing the darkness.

Could it be that all that pain might be a catalyst to break up the fallow ground to create a fertile soil for the Gospel to take root and grow? Is this a place where God’s mercy becomes magnified? He spends a lot of time talking about how much He loves widows and orphans. Well, there are plenty of both here. This place is rich with opportunities for God to bestow His mercy.

So, instead of running to easier venues like Kenya or Rwanda, should we instead be like the FDNY firemen who rushed into the Twin Towers while everyone else was trying to get out? They gave their lives so others might live. Is that not what we are called to?
We saw mighty outpourings here in service after service that those in the sedate churches in the West have not experienced in over a generation. Many received healing miracles, including two old women who were crippled but can now walk. Others received the Baptism of the Holy Spirit in tongues during the altar calls. Is this not evidence of the heart of God?

And if this is where His heart is, should not ours, in spite of the difficulties, be here also?

“If thou forbear to deliver them that are drawn unto death, and those that are ready to be slain; If thou sayest, Behold, we knew it not; doth not he that pondereth the heart consider it? and he that keepeth thy soul, doth not he know it? and shall not he render to every man according to his works?”
(Pro 24:11-12)

Brother Dale,  Subscribe

Read Full Post »

Wow. Services today were beyond belief! It was like something you read about in a book about revivals. Something broke through today and these people will never be the same.

This has been Day 4 in a village called Kihihi, way out on the western edge of Uganda. Zaire is only a few miles down the road. There are gorillas somewhere around here that tourists come to see, but other than that, while it is not exactly remote, this place is pretty rural. Nobody ever comes here to hold Gospel meetings, never mind a white guy from America. But then, these are the kinds of places that the Lord has been sending me to for six years now, so what else is new?

uganda15b

People have been coming from everywhere, filling the place up. The church is a rude affair of sticks cobbled together to form the walls and roof and covered with a huge plastic tarp that has “US Aid” printed all over it. When it rains, it leaks all over.  But that doesn’t stop anyone – they just keep coming.

For three days the intensity has been increasing. Services start at 10 am and last straight through until 2 pm. That includes lots of singing and praying out loud and not one, but two messages from me. Then we come back after lunch at 4 pm for the 3rd service, and then immediately go into the open air crusade outside until late at night. I go back to the hotel after the 3rd service to recharge my battery, but Barry goes out to preach at the crusade. Two hundred souls have been saved here in the last few days – that’s 200, as in two hundred!

The excitement in the air can be felt in the reverberations that come from the praying … no, praying is not quite a strong enough word … more like intense war, the thick of combat, the smoke of battle and the victory that only strong faith can lay claim to. Our revival prayer meetings back in the States are anemic in comparison.  And this is just during the regular service!  When I call for repentance and rededication at the end of the message it is like unleashing a storm! You just cannot imagine what it is like unless you are here to experience it.  Just ask Barry when he gets home. He has never seen anything like it.

Tonight was the last service for me.  Before leaving, I wanted to at least have a time of prayer for healing sicknesses, both physical and spiritual. Pastor Noah started off by asking for testimonies, and a whole bunch of them came up to tell the things that had happened to them – some spiritual, some about the things they had learned, and some about how they got healed during the services.  And THEN we started the healing line.

Let me just say that the more I prayed over them, the longer the line got. (It’s always that way). We started with the usual aches, pains, and headaches. All those pains left. Then came a whole array of more serious things, like bleedings and paralyzed limbs.  Gone.  And then came a man who was deaf.  (Oh Lord, I need some help here. This would be a good time for you to show up.  I don’t know why I think it is easier to heal headaches than deafness, but Lord, everybody is watching so please help me out here.)

I didn’t really know what to do, but I had heard somewhere about a guy sticking his fingers in a deaf person’s ears and praying over him. Sounded like a good idea to me, so that’s what I did. I even popped my fingers out of his ear for a dramatic effect. (Was that supposed to help?)  Nada, nope, nothing. Still can’t hear.  Not to be denied, I prayed again (this time without the finger popping), and I prayed hard.

Pastor Noah started walking backwards from him, “Can you hear me now?” “Yes”.

A little further back, “Can you hear me now?”  “Yes”

And so on, all the way to the back of the church. Way back there, I could barely hear Noah, but this deaf man heard him perfectly!

Am I jazzed?  Ya think? Somewhere about 20 to 30 people got healed – almost everyone that came up. Yes, there was one boy with a large tumor that, when I prayed over him, did not disappear. Maybe it will later, I don’t know, but it didn’t vanish on the spot like I expected. That’s a real bummer, but I don’t know what else to do. Maybe this gift of healing is a thing that grows as your faith expands. I hope so, because the look of desperate relief on the faces of the people who did get healed is priceless.

Something huge happened in Kihihi. Huge. You could feel it in the air like something broke through some long established spiritual walls.  Old theological ideas were smashed, personal wants were traded for a burden for lost souls, and a long ago buried faith that had been almost smothered by a mediocre church burst out of the grave and rose again in people’s hearts. They will never be the same … ever.

Neither will I

uganda15a

Read Full Post »

Whew! What a day. I should’ve known right from the beginning that it was going to be a humdinger. The devil got up early and stayed up late, but he is such a punk that all he can do is trouble us; he can’t stop us.

We had trouble the first thing in the morning. The Bishop locked the keys in the car!  But you have to hear this because this is really funny: he was in the car and decided to check the water before he came to get me. Now, the keys are on one of those key fobs that have the buttons to lock and unlock the car, but this one is very squirrelly. The alarm is unstable and will often go off all by itself.  So the bishop gets out of the car, and – beep, beep – the car locks itself!  Yeah, tell me that ain’t the devil!

Okay, so we bind together in prayer, and the Lord brings him to someone who is able to easily unlock it. Good.  We are off to the meeting.  Now remember, we still have to drive an hour, and these people have been waiting all morning having slept there overnight on the floor of the church.  But when we get there we get the same rambunctious greeting on the dirt path that we got yesterday. You just got to love these people!

Image

The message poured out of me again. I had no idea where I was going next, but I just kept going!  I love it when God does that. It’s a little scary when you have no idea what you are going to preach about, and you have to just swallow real hard, stand up, open your mouth, and hope something comes out that makes sense.  But once I got on the horse, it was like riding a wild stallion. I could feel the fallow ground being broken in their hearts.  This is what I’ve been struggling up against for two days, but finally it broke.  As I called them forth to the altar, you could have heard their cries a mile away.

Broken, crucified prayer breaks up the fallow ground so that the seeds of the Word of God can be planted in their hearts, but it is the tears of repentance that waters the seeds which causes the harvest to spring forth out of the ground. It was that kind of prayer, and yeah, it was that good.  It can only get better from here.

Image

But I should have known the battle wasn’t over.  Right after we finished praying, a pastor told us that the car had a flat.  Now remember, we are 50 km from the nearest gas station, so there is no place and no electricity to get it repaired. The tire was just fine until we started breaking through to the Throne of God.  Satan must have been livid!

We managed to air up a spare (which was also flat) with a bicycle pump and we limped back to Soroti.  I was so exhausted that I barely made it up the stairs to collapse on the bed. That’s when you know you’ve put in a good day in the Lord.

This is the last day for this group. Nothing has gone the way I expected, none of the messages have been what I usually bring, so I would imagine that the results will be anything but usual or expected.

And that is something to smile about!

[These articles were written during my trip to Uganda in 2011]

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »